Teenage dating in highschool

by  |  12-Aug-2015 10:17

Interestingly, the rates of reported victimization versus perpetration in the state were similar for boys and girls.[3] However, when it comes to severe teen dating violence — including sexual and physical assault — girls were disproportionately the victims.[4] At a recent workshop on teen dating violence, co-sponsored by the U. Departments of Justice (DOJ) and Health and Human Services (HHS), researchers presented findings from several studies that found that girls and boys perpetrate the same frequency of physical aggression in romantic relationships.

This finding was at odds with what practitioners attending the workshop said they encounter in their professional experience.

It's no secret that the dating landscape has changed a lot in the last few years—awkward setups have been traded for e-matchmaking, with research showing that one in 10 people have used a dating site or phone app to connect with potential mates.

teenage dating in highschool-48

According to the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, approximately 10 percent of adolescents nationwide reported being the victim of physical violence at the hands of a romantic partner during the previous year.[1] The rate of psychological victimization is even higher: Between two and three in 10 reported being verbally or psychologically abused in the previous year, according to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.[2] As for perpetration rates, there are currently no nationwide estimates for who does the abusing, and state estimates vary significantly.

In South Carolina, for example, nearly 8 percent of adolescents reported being physically violent to a romantic partner.

In fact, co-founder Justin Mateen recently disclosed that more than 7 percent of Tinder users are between 13 and 17, a significant chunk considering 35-to-44-year-olds constitute just 6.5 percent.

For the uninitiated, it works like this: Tinder pulls your photos and basic information from Facebook (age, location, mutual friends, and interests) to create a profile that the app's other users can scroll through.

Sixteen-year-old Giofenley has used Tinder to prank people with her friends: "We just mess around and create fake profiles." Ashley, a high school junior from Texas, agrees. "We just say the weirdest, dumbest, most outrageous stuff we would Suffice it to say, for every person who's had a positive experience with dating apps and sites, there's someone with a catfishing story that makes online dating seem like a nightmare. But these precautions don't eliminate threats—just like Giofenley and her friends were able to misrepresent themselves through fake Tinder profiles, anyone else out there can too.

Community Discussion