Australia cam chat - Dating antique axe heads

by  |  15-Jan-2016 18:01

Most 18th-century felling axes were single bit, which means it had a cutting edge on one side and a flat hammer-like head called the poll, or butt, at the other.Double-bit axes had two edges—a sharp one for cutting trees and limbs, and a duller one with a shorter taper for splitting firewood.Significantly, the handles of double-bit axes were straight rather than curved.

North American broad axes varied in their designs from region to region—the heads of those made in New England, for example, tended to be narrower in width than those made by Pennsylvania blacksmiths.

Broad axes brought over from England generally lacked a hammer-like poll, while those imported from Germany had a medieval-looking goose-wing design.

The most familiar type of axe (also correctly spelled “ax”) is the felling axe, whose long, curved handle increases its impact.

The heads of these axes varied regionally in terms of their design, but their functionality was the same.

Cast-iron axes with heads weighing seven pounds were swung by pioneers and Colonists, who used the versatile tool to clear land for crops and build their homes.

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